Gavin McGuire, Tandridge, Surrey, UK, Tel: 01892 770310, 07770 316482, E-mail: gavinmcguirecars@gmail.com
 

Austin 16/6

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Year 1932
Description

The Austin 7 has become such an icon of inexpensive 1920s and 30s motoring that it is easy to forget that the company also produced several excellent larger models aimed at the middle/upper end of the market. This Salmons bodied two/four seat drop head coupe is a perfect example of the sort of Austin a well-off family of the 1930s would have been happy to own.

The first thing that strikes you about the car is the quality of the bodywork, the grey and black paint finish, the blue leather interior trim, the blue carpets and its black hood – all of which are as good as anything I have seen for a long time. This impression continues when you look in the engine compartment and underneath the car – it is quite simply in remarkably good order throughout! Fortunately there are over 100 photographs in the file showing its structural and mechanical restoration from start to finish so you can see for yourself the amount of work that has been done on the car.

The second thing which will impress you is the way it drives which is not only the outcome of its excellent restoration but is very much a result of Austin’s high quality design and manufacturing processes. The 16 hp 2.1 litre six cylinder engine is smooth, the clutch is light, the four speed gearbox is quiet and easy to use, the steering is positive, the brakes are good and the coachbuilt body is very sound and rattle free so the car is a real pleasure to drive.

There is an invoice in the file for engine work done by Formhalls Vintage & Racing Ltd and also a new radiator core being made. Intriguingly there is an invoice for a new set of tyres supplied to Tickford Ltd in Bedworth which could be supporting evidence for a note on the file which says that the car was restored by them (by the way Salmons changed their name to Tickford in 1942).There are pictures showing some serious body work being carried out and the high quality of the workmanship could well support the idea of a professional coachbuilder being involved though I make no claims on the subject!  

By way of ownership history we have a continuation buff card log book which runs from 1939 to 1992, the first name shown being Otto Dorer McIntosh who was a professional violinist of German descent who died in the 1970s. The car was acquired in around 1955 by a Mr. Reynolds who kept it until at least 1992. It appears that it was then taken on by a Mr. Appleyard before being bought by a Mr Sanger in 2003 with the current owner buying it from Mr Sanger's family after his sad demise. The V5C indicates that the car has had four previous registered keepers before its current owner which ties in with the information we have.

In summary this is a high quality traditional English touring car which is very smartly presented, is in really fine mechanical condition and has an interesting history. It drives very well indeed and should make a very good touring car as well as being a real crowd puller at any show you might take it to.

It is, I believe, also very good value for money!  

P.S. it comes with an original November 1932 Austin Light Six handbook.        

 

 

    

  

The Austin 7 has become such an icon of inexpensive 1920s and 30s motoring that it is easy to forget that the company also produced several excellent larger models aimed at the middle/upper end of the market. This Salmons bodied two/four seat drop head coupe is a perfect example of the sort of Austin a well-off family of the 1930s would have been happy to own.

The first thing that strikes you about the car is the quality of the bodywork, the grey and black paint finish, the blue leather interior trim, the blue carpets and its black hood – all of which are as good as anything I have seen for a long time. This impression continues when you look in the engine compartment and underneath the car – it is quite simply in remarkably good order throughout! Fortunately there are over 100 photographs in the file showing its structural and mechanical restoration from start to finish so you can see for yourself the amount of work that has been done on the car.

The second thing which will impress you is the way it drives which is not only the outcome of its excellent restoration but is very much a result of Austin’s high quality design and manufacturing processes. The 16 hp 2.1 litre six cylinder engine is smooth, the clutch is light, the four speed gearbox is quiet and easy to use, the steering is positive, the brakes are good and the coachbuilt body is very sound and rattle free so the car is a real pleasure to drive.

There is an invoice in the file for engine work done by Formhalls Vintage & Racing Ltd and also a new radiator core being made. Intriguingly there is an invoice for a new set of tyres supplied to Tickford Ltd in Bedworth which could be supporting evidence for a note on the file which says that the car was restored by them (by the way Salmons changed their name to Tickford in 1942).There are pictures showing some serious body work being carried out and the high quality of the workmanship could well support the idea of a professional coachbuilder being involved though I make no claims on the subject!  

By way of ownership history we have a continuation buff card log book which runs from 1939 to 1992, the first name shown being Otto Dorer McIntosh who was a professional violinist of German descent who died in the 1970s. The car was acquired in around 1955 by a Mr. Reynolds who kept it until at least 1992. It appears that it was then taken on by a Mr. Appleyard before being bought by a Mr Sanger in 2003 with the current owner buying it from Mr Sanger's family after his sad demise. The V5C indicates that the car has had four previous registered keepers before its current owner which ties in with the information we have.

In summary this is a high quality traditional English touring car which is very smartly presented, is in really fine mechanical condition and has an interesting history. It drives very well indeed and should make a very good touring car as well as being a real crowd puller at any show you might take it to.

It is, I believe, also very good value for money!  

P.S. it comes with an original November 1932 Austin Light Six handbook.        

 

 

    

  

Price  NOW SOLD